Category: Crime Prevention

Borough commander news

Borough commander news

I want to express a thank you to our former BCU Commander Mr Mike Hamer, who left service yesterday. He spent a long time in Central East BCU, concluding his long career as borough commander for Hackney and Tower Hamlets. Under his command Tower Hamlets managed to reduce the rating of the borough from worst for ASB to third worst in the national context.

Many thanks also for mentioning the volunteer involvement in the boroughs, this includes us, the members of Neighbourhood Watch in Tower Hamlets. Our new watch signs, show the Met Police logo as well as the Council logo.

Hopefully Mr Hamer will consider joining Neighbourhood Watch with an active role at his place of residence. Neighbourhood Watch – Ourwatch is a national organisation, and you can join wherever you live and transfer membership to a new borough by simply changing your address on the system. We’d also encourage all residents, councillors and business operators to join Neighbourhood Watch to get a bigger impact.

Welcome to the interim Commander, Det. Supt Dan Rutland, who fills in until the new Borough Commander James Conway will take over this post. As he is from Special Operations, we will have a person in charge who is well equipped to deal with the many types of problems we encounter in our vicinity including routine interrupting demonstrations and criminal gangs who try to operate in our borough.

I display the final message from Mr Mike Hamer below for your kind attention.

Safer Neighbourhood Team 2022

Safer Neighbourhood Team 2022

The Metropolitan Police’s prestigious Safer Neighbourhood Team of the year award went to Tower Hamlets Safer Neighbourhoods in 2022.

Safer Neighbourhoods Tower Hamlets includes many agencies including

  • Tower Hamlets Council
  • Tower Hamlets Homes ASB Team
  • Parkguard
  • Tower Hamlets Safer Neighbourhoods Policing Teams
  • Tower Hamlets Neighbourhood Watch Association
  • All schools, landlords, agencies, who participated
See the exact wording written below

Safer Neighbourhoods Team of the Year Award

For those who make a significant and sustained contribution to policing in their local communities.

Tower Hamlets suffered an increase in anti-social behaviour (ASB) and drug offending, which had a negative impact on local communities. The team made it their mission to improve the situation and connect with those hard-to-teach communities, in the densely populated borough that is within five percent of the most deprived areas nationally.

In 2021, the Tower Hamlets Homes Policing Team developed and led on several operations including Operation Mizuna, which used data to identify hotspots and drive action. They chaired multi-agency partnership and residents’ meetings, initiated numerous diversionary schemes for young people with partners, and piloted modern technology to improve information sharing pathways.

With partners, the team provided housing for the homeless and support to drug addicts. Their efforts over six months saw 50% reduction in ASB and in 2021 they seized £108,000 total value of drugs and cash, obtained 12 civil inunctions, made 231 arrests and seized 80 offensive weapons. Their action improved public confidence and the quality of life for others.

Their methods are now being adopted across Hackney and Tower Hamlets and beyond!

For the general public the engagement bus is most prominent to see in Neighbourhoods.

Public engagement event at Cambridge Heath Road in the summer of 2022.
National hate crime awareness week

National hate crime awareness week

Organised by NationalHCAW from 8. to 15. October 2022

See the events planned for the whole week nationally and locally

Report Hate Crime

 What is a hate crime?

Hate crimes are any crimes that are targeted at a person because of hostility or prejudice towards that person’s:

  • disability
  • race or ethnicity
  • religion or belief
  • sexual orientation
  • transgender identity

They can be committed against a person or property. A victim does not have to be a member of the group at which the hostility is targeted. In fact, anyone could be a victim of a hate crime. 

What is a hate incident?

Hate Incidents can feel like crimes to those who suffer them and often escalate to crimes or tension in a community. 

For this reason the police are concerned about incidents and you can use the True Vision website to report non-crime hate incidents. 

The police can only prosecute when the law is broken but can work with partners to try and prevent any escalation in seriousness.

Why should I report hate crime?

Hate crimes and incidents hurt; they can be confusing and frightening.

By reporting them when they happen to you, you may be able to prevent these incidents from happening to someone else.  You will also help the police understand the extent of hate crime in your local area so they can better respond to it.

Reporting makes a difference – to you, your friends, and your life.

How can I report Hate Crime?

 There are several ways you can report a hate crime, whether you have been a victim, a witness, or you are reporting on behalf of someone else:

In an emergency

  • call 999 or 112.
  • If you cannot make voice calls, you can now contact the 999 emergency services by SMS text from your mobile phone. However, you will only be able to use this service if you have registered with emergencySMS first. See the emergencySMS website for details(opens in new window).

2. Contact the police

  • Who you can speak to in confidence. You do not have to give your personal details, but please be aware the investigation and ability to prosecute the offender(s) is severely limited if the police cannot contact you. Contact your local police force, either by telephone or by visiting your local police station. Details on how to contact your local police force can be found at www.police.uk  (opens in new window).

3. Report online

  • You can report online using the facility on this website.  Go to the ‘Reporting online’ page (opens in new window).

4. Self-reporting form

  • You can download the self reporting form and send this to your local police force. The forms, including an Easy Read version, can be found on the ‘Report a hate crime’ page (opens in new window).

5. Third party reporting centres

  • Local agencies such as the Citizens Advice Bureau, Community Voluntary Services etc can also report the incident on your behalf and provide you with advice and support. The ‘Organisations that can help’ page has a list of those organisations that may be able to help you (opens in new window).

6. Crimestoppers

  • If you do not want to talk to the police or fill in the reporting forms, you can still report a hate crime by calling Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111 or via their website at www.crimestoppers-uk.org. Tell them what you know 100% anonymously. Always. Speak up. Stop crime. Stay safe.

More information listed on the police funded True Vision website.

www.report-it.org.uk

Community Safety Charter

Community Safety Charter

COMMUNITY SAFETY CHARTER launched to tackle crimes in public spaces

The Community Safety Charter, encourages everyone from individuals, Neighbourhood Watch groups, businesses, and organisations to take an active stance against crimes in public spaces, such as harassment, hate crime, and antisocial behaviour.   

The Charter tagline is #BETHECHANGE, focusing on the role of active bystanders in leading the change within their communities. The Charter supports greater understanding about how we recognise and deal with community safety issues and support victims by knowing where to get help, how and who to report to, enabling a more positive, proactive approach by the whole community when witnessing or experiencing confrontation, hostility, or harassment.  

Get this post card to give to your neighbours and friends, contact us

Do I need to make a pledge? We are delighted to invite you to sign up to the Charter.  By signing up individuals, businesses, organisations, and groups pledge to four actions:

·  PROMOTE –        promote a culture that does not tolerate harmful language, antisocial behaviour and hostility toward others

·  ENABLE –             enable others to identify and take an active stance to prevent harassment, antisocial behaviour and intimidation within their community

·  REPORT –             actively encourage and support others to report harassment, antisocial behaviour and intimidation and share intelligence about these crimes with the relevant authorities

·  SUPPORT –          support those affected by harassment, antisocial behaviour and intimidation and refer victims to the appropriate support agency  

What will I receive when I sign up? You will receive a printable poster, individual pledges to share on social media, and a comprehensive information pack on a specific topic or crime every two months which you can share with your staff/volunteers/colleagues/friends. The topics covered in the first year are:  

·  harassment
·  hate crime
·  antisocial behaviour
·  being an active bystander
·  dealing with confrontation
·  leading the change in our communities   

Where can I find out more?

·  Watch an interactive presentation here
How do I sign up? Simply complete the online form on ourwatch.org.uk/charter. Once you have signed up, we will contact you with you within 5 working days to share the first information pack and other resources.    Please share the details of the Charter with your networks and encourage them also to sign up and share it.    #BeTheChange   Central Support Team | NEIGHBOURHOOD WATCH NETWORK
Follow us… ourwatch.org.ukFacebook / Twitter / Instagram / LinkedIn
Neighbourhood Watch Network is a charity registered in England & Wales, CIO no: 1173349 CELEBRATING 40 YEARS OF CREATING SAFER, CONNECTED AND ACTIVE COMMUNITIES Please note: This email has been sent to all Neighbourhood Watch supporters within our network  

Gun surrender project

Gun surrender project

As part of the general violence reduction strategy, which saw knife bins installed in Tower Hamlets, we can now look forward to the ‘Firearms surrender’ project.

There are however no bins, to drop guns into. Weapons should be handed to front counter staff at identified police stations.

The main locations are:
SOUTH WESTTwickenham Police Station, 41 London Road, Twickenham, TW1 3SY.
SOUTH EASTLewisham Police Station, 43 Lewisham High St, Lewisham, SE13 5JZ.
SOUTH AREACroydon Police Station, 71 Park Lane, Croydon, CR9 1BP.
CENTRAL SOUTH Brixton Police Station, 367 Brixton Road, Brixton, SW9 7DD.
CENTRAL WESTHammersmith Police Station, 226 Shepherds Bush Road, Hammersmith, W6 7NX.
CENTRAL NORTHIslington Police Station, 2 Tolpuddle Street, The Angel, Islington, N1 0YY.
CENTRAL EASTStoke Newington Police Station, 33 Stoke Newington High St, London, N16 8DS.
NORTH EASTForest Gate Police Station, 350-360 Romford Rd, London, E7 8BS.
NORTH WESTWembley Police Station, 603 Harrow Rd, Wembley, HA0 2HH.
NORTH AREATottenham Police Station, 398 High Rd, Tottenham, N17 9JA
WEST AREAActon Police Station, 250 High St, Acton, W3 9BH.
EAST AREARomford Police Station, 19 Main Road, Romford, RM1 3BJ.
CITY of LONDONBishopsgate Police Station, 182 Bishopsgate, EC2M 4NP.

  • Information on how to report a suspected firearms discharge, or to provide information to the police on where firearms are being stored or who is in possession of a firearm can be made via 999, by tweeting @MetCC or via our website.
  • Alternatively, Police encourage anyone with information to contact Crimestoppers. They never ask your name and they cannot trace your call, your IP address or the device you use. Fill in their quick online form or call 0800 555 111.
  • The Tower Hamlets Neighbourhood Watch Association anonymous reporting, facilitates you to submit your information online locally.
  • It could save a life.

Detective Chief Superintendent Nick Blackburn concluded: “We need your help to remove weapons from our streets. Too often we come across family members or friends of criminals being asked to hide firearms. They often believe they won’t be arrested or prosecuted – they will. “If someone asks you to conceal a weapon, they are putting the risk on you. If you are caught in possession of a firearm, the likelihood is you will be jailed for a minimum of five years.”
“Often the firearms we seize are converted and formally legally-owned. They are then acquired by criminals and distributed for illegal use.
“Help us to reduce the threat of gun crime in London. I would urge anyone to seize this opportunity if it applies to you. If you have any information regarding gun crime, please speak to police or in confidence through the independent charity 100% anonymously.”

  • So far this year, lethal barrel discharges have reduced by 37 per cent (Jan-April 22) compared to the same period in 2021.
  • Officers have seized 524 lethal firearms from the streets (financial year 2021/22) compared with 480 in the same period for 2020/21 and 408 in 2019/20;
  • The number of shootings has also gone down from 283 in the financial year 2019/20 to 196 in 2021/22.
  • The results are thanks to dedicated proactive units carrying out long term, intelligence-led operations in areas of heightened gang criminality, spearheaded by our Specialist Crime Command. It means London is now a hostile place for criminals transporting firearms.  
  • Investigations into shootings are becoming stronger, with an increase in the number of charges brought for investigations into shootings rising from 20 per cent in 2019/20 to 38 per cent in 2021/22.
phone snatching

phone snatching

A menace feared by almost every phone owner today.

Opportunist thieves, usually on bikes, cycle around busy spots and look for easy victims to snatch a phone out of their hands.

Busy places like bus stops, outside of pubs, pedestrian areas, all of which have easy cyclist access are among those targeted.

All the thief looks out for is

how you stand, how they can get away, how easy it is to snatch your phone without being pulled off their bikes. or if on foot, how quick they can run off without being caught.

Of course, we all do it, check for messages, use the taxi app, banking app, the map, answer and make calls. That is what a phone is for.

Other thieves are targeting known users of luxury phone brands and do not shy away from using threats to life to get the phone handed over.

Question is what can we do to avoid falling victim to a phone snatcher. The answer isn’t easy.

Victim blaming is never a good idea but we need to think how we can prevent the phone being taken.

For many, the value of the phone is secondary to the tragic loss of personal photos and files and the whole inconvenience of having to buy a new phone.

First principle always has to be your personal safety.

What solutions are available?

another option is Immobilise marking
  • CCTV is only useful if the perpetrator is known and can be clearly seen and identified.
  • Rendering the phone useless after it has been stolen is not currently available because if it was, the thefts would stop, unless of course thieves steal phones for their material value.
  • Targeting known re-sale outlets (this was successfully implemented by police for stolen bikes)

In the meantime, how can we prevent our phone being stolen?

  • Always be alert
  • never hold your phone away from your body whilst holding it in one hand
  • Prior to looking at apps, check the area around you, if necessary stand in a less approachable position or area.
  • Keep the phone inside a bag, so it cannot be seen
  • Use smart water to mark your phone

If your phone has been stolen always immediately report to police, to your phone service provider and all banks and related institutions connected to your phone use.

Most people do not have the presence of mind to remember the details of the thieve as they concentrate on their phone at the moment of theft.

Efficiency of Ward Panels

Efficiency of Ward Panels

To obtain the best results from ward panel meetings we recommend that each panel has an agenda that as closely as possible resembles the recommended agenda, as stated in the Ward Panel Handbook on page 15.

  1. Apologies and Introductions
  2. Minutes and actions from the last meeting
  3. Police actions on the previous priorities
  4. Police report on crime, ASB, ward panel survey results and activity
  5. Community concerns
  6. Agreeing priorities and actions on them
  7. evaluating and suggesting community contact sessions
  8. any other business
  9. date of the next meeting

It proves very beneficial if point 4 gets processed in each meeting because the majority of ward residents use the survey rather than attend in person. If all those in attendance get to know that certain points are already known through the survey, then that frees up time for other issues and those in attendance do not have to highlight this again.

Ward Priorities cannot be set by the panel if survey results are not being disclosed to the panel.

The Ward Panel Handbook states throughout the composition of membership should be wide-reaching and include local partners as well as representatives of community groups.

  • page 10 the ward panel structure
  • page 11 – 12 recommends community representation
  • page 17 – 21 crime comparisons are very important to highlight types of crime and how they varied over time

Point 5 Community concerns can be wide-reaching and include anything from ASB to Hate etc.

Community Contact sessions, in point 7, can be addressed with Councillors attending and together with point 6, each SNT Team can actually request Assurance Patrols in conjunction with registered Police volunteers.

We ask all of you to actively communicate with your Ward Panel chair or SNT officer in charge to request an effective ward panel procedure.

Reporting concerns

Reporting concerns

We see it every day. People post on social media sites, film, pics of alleged perpetrators.

  • A person is shown taking a package from a door
  • A man with dogs is accused of paedophilia because he walks out at school runs
  • reports of criminal activities, but going to report later
  • Requests for information of individual in pictures whilst accusing them of a crime

Putting such content on social media harms our safety.

All of those can land you in court.

Accusing others of a crime and not having this processed via proper law enforcement can lead to mob law, sentiments of lynching and taking justice and judging into our own hands.

If you know about a crime and do not report it, you can be prosecuted for hindering the police.

Breaches of privacy and accusations of libel can be made against you if you post pictures of others on social media because you accuse them of a crime but they have not been convicted.

You may not want to report to police directly, so please use our anonymous reporting form and send your pictures, description and concerns and we will gladly forward this to police. Your details will not be recorded and the accused will not be published anywhere but to police.

Again, we would strongly encourage to not provide any evidence to individuals asking for this because they allege a crime has been committed. You may find yourself giving information to agents of other countries or crime syndicates, collecting intelligence about a person if you do.

All crime must be reported to police and a crime reference number obtained and then all evidence collected must be handed to police with that reference number.

Never give any evidence to individuals asking but only give to police or provide anonymously for passing on to police.

We have a record number of police officers in service now and the more concise and correct information you provide the easier it will be for law enforcement to process your reports.

All emergencies must be reported to 999 at all times.

See our reporting page for more information